About the Communitarian Network

In the late 1980s, a growing number of academicians and social commentators began to notice a breakdown in the moral fabric of society. Attributing this condition to an excessive emphasis on individualism in the public sphere, they recognized the need for a social philosophy that at once protected individual rights and attended to corresponding responsibilities to the community. Transcending the stalemate between left and right, this new “responsive communitarian” philosophy articulated a middle way between the politics of radical individualism and excessive statism.

In 1990, a group of academicians and social thinkers came together to formulate the core ideas they shared, spelled out in the Responsive Communitarian Platform, and to spur the movement toward a recasting of the social and moral foundations of society. A quarterly journal, The Responsive Community: Rights and Responsibilities, was founded in 1991 to provide a forum for the development and exploration of Communitarian ideas. In 1993, Amitai Etzioni formed The Communitarian Network, a non-partisan, transnational, not-for-profit network of Communitarians, and he has since served as its director.

The Communitarian Network organizes dialogues, develops Communitarian position papers, conducts public meetings, and advises legislatures and community groups regarding issues of moral and social issues of import for the well being of society.

The Communitarian Network is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization. All contributions to the organization are dedicated to our work. The Network gratefully acknowledges the contributors and staff who help make its work possible.

 

 

News

Rules of Engagement and Abusive Citizens

Read the full article, “Rules of Engagement and Abusive Citizens,” Prism, 2014.

Israel and Palestine: There’s Still Room at the Inn

Simon Schama’s new TV series and bookThe Story of the Jews is particularly timely, although he’s covering well-ploughed ground.

Near East and Far East: Not So Distant

Many observations about the Near and Far East view them as if they were worlds apart.

Two People, One Land?

An old anti-Zionist argument has recently been reasserted by one of the mildest critics, Ari Shavit. In his book My Promised Land, Shavit promotes the thesis that the ultimate source of the trouble between Israelis and Palestinians is a grand illusion which was and is at the core of Zionism.

In Defense of Drones

Originally published in The Diplomat Amnesty International has just issued a report that is highly critical of the use of drones by the United States. Its main concern is the great number of civilian casualties that these strikes cause – the so-called collateral damage. There is considerable disagreement among observers about the extent of these casualties.